Author: My 15 Hour Work Week

The New DBS Multiplier Account: The Best Savings Account For Frugal Millennials

Introducing The New DBS Multiplier Account In early October, a friend alerted me to the revamp of the DBS Multiplier Account. She had received an email which mentioned that DBS will be adjusting the interest upwards to 3.5% come 1 November 2017. I was quite privileged to be invited to a pre-launch briefing by DBS in late October and I was blown away by the attractiveness of the new DBS Multiplier Account. Why I Think It’s A Great Savings Account It’s so Flexible. Just a Salary Credit + 1 Category would allow you to enjoy up to 2.08% of...

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The New DBS Multiplier Account: The Best Savings Account For Frugal Millennials

Introducing The New DBS Multiplier Account In early October, a friend alerted me to the revamp of the DBS Multiplier Account. She had received an email which mentioned that DBS will be adjusting the interest upwards to 3.5% come 1 November 2017. I was quite privileged to be invited to a pre-launch briefing by DBS in late October and I was blown away by the attractiveness of the new DBS Multiplier Account.   Why I Think It’s A Great Savings Account It’s so Flexible. Just a Salary Credit + 1 Category would allow you to enjoy up to 2.08%...

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What If I Had Invested In Berkshire B For The Past 7 Years

It’s been 7 years and the 15HWW portfolio currently stands at around $430,000. It comprises $350,000 of capital which also means that the remaining $80,000 comes from net profits, dividends and interest from the deployment of the capital. With sporadic injections of $350,000 of capital over 7 years, a simple proxy would be to assume that we are injecting $50,000 every year which is also equivalent to injecting $12,500 every quarter. From this set of assumptions, I calculated that our annualised return thus far is 6.0%. But what would have been the returns and outcome if I did not bother much about the markets and just invested...

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What If I Had Invested In Berkshire B For The Past 7 Years

It’s been 7 years and the 15HWW portfolio currently stands at around $430,000. It comprises $350,000 of capital which also means that the remaining $80,000 comes from net profits, dividends and interest from the deployment of the capital. With sporadic injections of $350,000 of capital over 7 years, a simple proxy would be to assume that we are injecting $50,000 every year which is also equivalent to injecting $12,500 every quarter. From this set of assumptions, I calculated that our annualised return thus far is 6.0%. But what would have been the returns and outcome if I did not bother much about the markets and just invested...

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What If I Had Invested In The STI ETF For The Past 7 Years

It’s been 7 years and the 15HWW portfolio currently stands at around $430,000. It comprises $350,000 of capital which also means that the remaining $80,000 comes from net profits, dividends and interest from the deployment of the capital. With sporadic injections of $350,000 of capital over 7 years, a simple proxy would be to assume that we are injecting $50,000 every year which is also equivalent to injecting $12,500 every quarter. From this set of assumptions, I calculated that our annualised return thus far is 6.0%. But what would have been the returns and outcome if I did not bother much about the markets and just...

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What If I Had Invested In The STI ETF For The Past 7 Years

It’s been 7 years and the 15HWW portfolio currently stands at around $430,000. It comprises $350,000 of capital which also means that the remaining $80,000 comes from net profits, dividends and interest from the deployment of the capital. With sporadic injections of $350,000 of capital over 7 years, a simple proxy would be to assume that we are injecting $50,000 every year which is also equivalent to injecting $12,500 every quarter. From this set of assumptions, I calculated that our annualised return thus far is 6.0%. But what would have been the returns and outcome if I did not bother much about the markets and just...

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My Results After 7 Years In The Market

I made our first foray into the stock market on 1st November 2010. It’s been 7 years and the 15HWW portfolio currently stands at around $430,000. It comprises $350,000 of capital which also means that the remaining $80,000 comes from net profits, dividends and interest from the deployment of the capital. I have kept a detailed record of my investment transactions over this period but not the cash injections into the portfolio. Accounting for cash is messy but excluding cash tends to overstate the portfolio return if the equities are performing better than the other instruments. But interestingly, since it’s...

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Portfolio Update: October 2017

In less than two weeks’ time, it would mark 7 years dabbling in the stock market for me. Besides these monthly updates, it has been some time since I wrote exclusively about investments and I shall be preparing a series of posts just for this milestone. Yup, peak period for my work is over and I have more free time these days. Month-on-month, the portfolio rose pretty significantly by $7,000 to reach $428,000 and it’s amazing that the 15HWW Permanent Portfolio is nearing $160,000 in value. This is supposed to be a defensive portfolio but over the past two years,...

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3 New Local Early Retirement Blogs I Am Following

I am actually quite intense when it comes to reading. Especially on personal finance or early retirement stuff. When I stumble onto a great blog, I am the kind who will spend a couple of hours digesting the “About” pages, rationalising the blogger’s finances and even putting myself in the shoes of the blogger to savour the journey better. And then proceed to re-read the exact same articles again some time later. This has applied to blogs like ERE, MMM and LivingaFI. Although two of them are not exactly Americans, they pulled off early retirement/financial independence/a long sabbatical (you...

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Expenses Update: September 2017

Even though we spent above $4,200 this month, I thought it was quite an impressive feat considering we made a couple of frivolous purchases like the $1,200 laptop and a $230 Samsonite luggage. Most notably, the duality of cooking more often at home and enjoying meals out on weekday afternoons instead of weekday evening/weekends was pretty powerful and our food expenses came down quite drastically as compared to the earlier months this year. There’s really little to no feelings of deprivation on this front. Average expenses for the year remained at around $4,260 and I reckon we will hit...

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Useful Thought Experiment: Spending $15,000 In A Month

I think less than 10% of Singapore households spend above $15,000 in a month. In fact, from this piece of statistic, it seems that even those who stays in landed properties spend only an average of $10,000 a month. So imagine you have $15,000 of passive income (in the form of dividends/interest from maybe a $5 million portfolio) EVERY MONTH. Basically, after finishing spending $15,000 in September, another $15,000 pops up in your bank account. For most, this is akin to having money raining on us every month. I thought it would be a useful thought experiment to see how...

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Portfolio Update: September 2017

Even with the North Korean tensions escalating, the market remained somewhat flat during the past month. So I was pretty delighted to eke out some decent gains for the portfolio, especially with the crediting of close to $2k worth of dividends during the past few weeks. The portfolio rose pretty significantly by $6k to reach $421,000 and a big contributor was the good performance of the DWI sub-portfolio as a couple of stocks there made good gains in the past month. The annualised return of all the sub-portfolios are above 6% again.  There was no transactions this month but I...

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Being “Miserly” To The Mrs?

I read SMOL’s post on the difference between frugal and miserly with quite a bit of interest. Not to mention the conversation it generated with the numerous comments. He basically summed up the difference as: A frugal person loves to spend less on himself; but when it comes to people that matter, he does not mind spending money on them. A miser will not spend money on himself and others. Although I largely agree with the above distinction, I personally don’t think it’s very useful, at least in my own situation. According to the Mrs, I tend to be “kinder and...

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Expenses Update: August 2017

We managed to set a new low for our expenses in August, spending less than $3,150 and after including this month’s expenditure, our average monthly expenditure this year has been cut to around $4,259. Since we have switched to UOB One from OCBC 360, there is much less incentive for us to dine at restaurants during weekends and I reckon this will help to keep our food expenses down,  a huge factor in the overall decrease in expenses. Let’s see if this trend continues for the next few months. Eating Out: $508.05 Hawker ($180) – Pretty reasonable as we alternate between home...

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A Thoughtful Teachers’ Day Gift

Honestly, I did not expect any gifts from my students on this day. Well, to me, the irony is that any teacher that “expects” to receive something in return for their hard work probably isn’t deserving of any. Not to mention tutors, where we are sometimes treated more like an “employee” rather than a teacher. I often tell my students that the best gift they can give is improving their learning attitude. When the attitude is right, more often than not, the results will come thereafter. And results is an internal KPI that I use to assess my performance....

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